Sega’s Sandbox Game Uses Actual Sand

This is just really neat and I wanted to share this cool upcoming Sega arcade game. It is called,E~deru Sunaba (translates loosely to “The Surprising Sandbox”) and through the magic of real-time projection mapping, kids can make all sorts of cool things in the sandbox.

According to kids in the video, the sand is very soft and easy to mold. However, it doesn’t stick to your hands. It looks like the game is currently in development, and it could change, but looks super neat!

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KonneKt Now on Kickstarter!

 

Children playing 1

Earlier this year I did a blog post about KonneKt, an award winning toy for isolated children to play with other children using the window between their hospital rooms and the hallway, designed by Job Jansweijer. It’s been a few months but now it is on Kickstarter!

The game KonneKt transforms the window between the isolated child and the non-isolated child into a canvas
for play. The game consists of foam shapes that can be attached to the window between the room of the
isolated child and the hallway using suction cups and magnets. By combining the shapes in different ways,
children can play games such as tic tac toe, connect four, or build together to make a fantasy world with a
dragon and a castle, or a jungle. Because the game can be used in so many ways, it is interesting for both boys
and girls of different ages.

Children playing 4 (Credit photographer Frans van Beek)

 

The goal of the Kickstarter campaign is to give a KonneKt game to 100 hospitals. People who want to support
KonneKt can choose for a ‘Buy one+Give one’ option: they buy one game, and donate the same game to one of
the participating hospitals. They can also choose to buy one game, which they can either keep themselves, or
give to a hospital. The aim is to collect the needed €30,000 euro in 40 days. The pledged amount will only be
charged if the aim of the Kickstarter campaign is met.

Portrait Job Jansweijer 1 (Credit photographer  Hans Stakelbeek)

 

So go support a cool product and awesome designer on the Kickstarter!

KonneKt: A Social Game For Isolated Children In The Hospital

Opportunity

During their treatment, many child cancer patients are isolated for medical reasons. During this period, they often feel quite well, and are very willing to play and to make contact with peers, but because they are not allowed to leave their rooms, they have no way to do so. Direct contact and play with peers is crucial for normal social development, but in some cases, isolation can take up to 4 months, which roughly disrupts this normal social development.

The goal of this project was to support normal social development of isolated children by empowering them to connect with their peers in the hospital in a very direct (face to face) way.

Impact

Multiple iterations of KonneKt were tested at child hospitals to analyze the impact and effect of KonneKt. I could tell you that KonneKt works very well, but everybody says that about his/her project, so I prefer to show you. For that, I would like to refer to the added movie (at 1m14s). In the movie you see two girls engaging in social play in a situation where that would not be possible (or probable) without KonneKt. KonneKt transforms the glass from a barrier into a medium for interaction. During the tests, children between 2 years old and 15 years old played with KonneKt.

In the observations, I learned that individual play with KonneKt attracts other children to play, so when isolated children are building something on their window on their own, their play can easily transform into social play when children join on the other side of the glass. The ambiguous, modular and open character of KonneKt makes it interesting for different kinds of children. The two girls in the movie are using KonneKt for ‘adventurous’ play, and the boy on the background is tinkering!

Because the production costs of KonneKt are low, realization of KonneKt is very feasible.

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Design With Intent Toolkit

Requisite Variety’s Design with Intent toolkit is a collection of design patterns, or ‘gambits’, for influencing user behaviour through design.

It’s applicable across productserviceinteraction, industrial and architectural design, aimed at socially and environmentally beneficial behaviour change. The patterns are drawn from a range of disciplines, and are phrased as questions or provocations to enable the toolkit’s use as both a brainstorming tool and a guide for exploring the field of design for behaviour change.

You can download the toolkit (free) or buy printed packs

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Visible sound – Sounds Butter Interactive Design Group

Really cool concept for making sounds visible. A is sewing machine is used as the basis for the project as it is synonymous with industry, and making physical products. Imagine stitching your favourite songs on your favourite Tee!

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What A Toaster Teaches You About The Future Of User Interfaces

The current model of good interaction design has run its course. Users have come to expect the rich, fluid, high-bitrate presentation and the direct manipulation and gestural interface control, as enabled by the latest generation of smartphones and tablets. For devices whose economics can support the internal parts cost required to deliver it, this style of interaction is simply table stakes. But while all product interactions need to be thoughtfully designed, rich screen-based interactions may not be the best direction. In fact, they are often just plain wrong.

Personalities and behaviors require us to rethink the meaning of good interaction design.

Even when it comes to the most sophisticated forms of technology, personality, behavior, and emotions often have more of an impact on a user than screen-based interactions. Body language is tremendously compelling; we pick up on it faster and trust it more implicitly than any other language. In one of my current projects, a robot that interacts intensively with people, our team has come to understand that people’s ability to read the status and intent of the robot at a distance and on the fly is far more important than the screen-focused interactions that the technology supports.

In lower-tech products, where rich screen-based interaction is not economically viable, thoughtful design of personality and behavior can be the critical differentiator that captures both market share and a price premium.

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