Intel Turns Water Into Electricity

On Thursday, September 12th, Intel showed off a low-power communications research project at the firm’s Intel Developer Forum (IDF), which uses wine to charge mobile devices.

The project was demonstrated by Dr Genevieve Bell, Intel’s forward thinking anthropologist executive who has been studying ways to solve the chipmaker’s mobile computing problems.

“Some people turn water into wine, here at Intel we’re turning wine into electricity,” – Bell

Demonstrating what is probably the perfect solution for energy conscious winos out there, an Intel Labs researcher talked through the project on stage alongside Bell, showing off a low-power processor and an accelerometer that were powered by a glass of wine.

“Here’s a peek inside the Intel Labs that might redefine what you think low power really is. Here I have a low-power communications solution, a low-power processing solution and an accelerometer,”

“When I talk about low-power you might think low-power as in one watt or two watt solutions you find in a phone. Today I’m not here to talk about Watts, or milli-Watts, but I’m here to talk about micro-Watts.”

The researcher – we didn’t catch his full name – boasted that the computing solutions being worked on in Intel Labs are so low in power that in the future we’ll be able to “power them by the heat of our skin, or the ambient light in the room”, or “something a little more entertaining”, he added, pointing at the wine glass hooked up to the accelerometer.

Referring to the old school lemon copper trick, the Intel Labs staffer took a big red bottle, poured some wine into the glass, attached some copper and some zinc, and performed an experiment that was not dissimilar to what most of us probably did in high school with lemons and copper electrodes.

Doing this showed the accelerometer data being transferred from the processor and sent to a computer, with a flower rendering on the computer, demonstrating the concept of powering a computing operation with what was left over from last night’s dinner.

According to Intel, the experiment showed that “low-power doesn’t actually mean low performance”.

“It’s possible to start to imagine a world of incredibly low power but also with high performance, which will help unburden us, help us do things that are remarkable and gives the ability to power things like constant sensing, communication, and computing – all of which are necessary for our mobile future,”

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3D Printable Ouya Game Console Case

Gamers will be able to design their own cases for the forthcoming Yves Behar-designed OUYA console and print them out with a MakerBot 3D printer.

The partnership will see OUYA upload 3D print files for the case to Thingiverse, the online design database operated by MakerBot, where they can be downloaded and produced with a desktop 3D printer.

The news comes two months after after mobile phone maker Nokia became the first major manufacturer to release 3D print files for its products, allowing consumers to print their own customised phone cases.

The OUYA’s case includes a lid and a spring-loaded button to house the console’s hardware, allowing users to make modifications to the standard round-edged cube designed by San Francisco designer Yves Behar.

As the first product from technology start-up Boxer8, the OUYA will allow developers to make their own games and tweak the hardware as they wish.

Based on open design principles that encourage users to develop and adapt products themselves, the console will run on Google’s Android operating system and all games will either be free or available as a free trial, while the hardware itself will cost only $99.

The development of OUYA was funded through Kickstarter, with supporters pledging £5.6 million in exchange for first access to the console, making it the second-highest earning project in the crowdfunding website’s history.

Some 1,200 Kickstarter investors were given developer versions of the console at the start of the year, but it’s expected to be available to the public this June.

Last week MakerBot unveiled a prototype of a desktop scanner that will allow users to digitally scan objects they want to replicate with a 3D printerat home – see all MakerBot news and all 3D printing news.

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Speak-er by The

Speak-er are high-quality speakers that plug directly into your MP3 player or computer and, as Engadget puts it, “the most awesome set of desk speakers this planet has ever known” (view review ). Each set includes a left and right speaker.

Construction: Polished white ABS housing with black steel grille
Dimensions: 4h × 6w × 2″d
Weight: 3.5 lbs
Full specs + instructions

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Cartel – Office Assistant

Cartel is a personal assistant for collextive mind purpose. Cartel allows employees to improve their productivity, and at the same time keep a use of social network in the Company. Moreover, with its public features, Cartel allows you to record every missed visits at your office, when you wasn’t available at your desk. And it’s just as simple to use as it’s look!

Design by Valentin Sollier, Arthur Kenzo, Valentin Gauffre