Loopwheels by Sam Pearce

Pearce is an inventor and design consultant. He’s worked on non-invasive surgery equipment, early handheld PCs of the Palm Pilot era, 3-D folding mechanisms, and motorbikes. It’s always something new, and in 2007, it was baby strollers. Around that time Pearce was sitting in an airport in the Netherlands, waiting for his flight. He noticed a woman pushing a stroller. “As the woman got to a curb, she didn’t lift the front wheels and the baby was shot forward,” he says. “If the wheel hits the curb at the wrong angle it’s useless. So I just wondered, why can’t you put the suspension into the wheel?”

Baby strollers make for a great case study in how wheels interact with impact, which is to say, not very well at all. A stroller has shock absorbers underneath the seat, which helps reduce bounciness, but it doesn’t keep the wheels from bouncing backwards when they hit a curb head on. In a matter of about five seconds, Pearce had a new idea. He began envisioning a system that incorporated shock absorption directly into the wheels, making them capable of flexibly rolling over bumps instead of just rebounding. He drew a sketch, and then put it aside for two years. At the time, “it wasn’t relevant,” he says. “I couldn’t really see how I could make one, but I have lots of ideas, and this one kept coming back to me.”

After some 70 iterations, Pearce and the team of bow-makers hit on the right recipe. It’s proprietary, but Pearce describes it as a “carbon composite construction.” Loopwheels first debuted on bikes—mountain bikes are next—before a wheelchair manufacturer caught wind of the new wheels and started sourcing them from Pearce. “We say it’s triple-smooth,” Pearce says. The suspension in the wheels smooths out any traveling over bumps, and “gets rid of all the road buzz.” That’s crucial to wheelchair users, whose bodies are in full contact with the vehicle, meaning they often absorb road shock right along with the chair. Equally important to users? Cost. Pearce says he more or less arrived at an ideal design two years ago, but has since worked on refining manufacturing techniques, in part by adopting processes from the auto industry, to get the price down from $2,000 a wheel, to a few hundred dollars (depending on the model). “There’s only so much people will pay for new technology,” Pearce says. That’s true for wheelchairs, and it’s true for mountain bikes, which Pearce says is next in line for Loopwheels.

Their Kickstarter just recently succeeded to fund with over £20,000

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Swedes Develop Invisible Bike Helmet

You know what kind of sucks about riding a bike? Other than all that pedaling? Bike helmets. Yes, they keep that head of yours from getting splattered, but they take a lot of the open-air-joy out of things, and they’re not all that comfortable. A pair of Swedish women have developed a remarkable solution: the invisible bike helmet.

Once you see how their Hövding helmet works it all makes sense, and is a very clever solution that draws from a number of technologies that are well-established and familiar. They’ve done a pretty impressive job with the design and engineering of this.

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SEIL Backpack By Lee, Myung Su

This concept is for any cyclist fanatics out there. Usually, bicycle riders use a pouch or backpack to carry a wallet, a mobile phone, water bottles and more. Bicycle riders’ backpacks are a must-have item for outdoor activities. On top of this, the SEIL bag gives bicycle riders a safety feature instead of using hand signals. The LED and flexible PCB applied SEIL bag is not only just a backpack, but also a safety device controlled by you.

The SEIL bag provides you with a simple controller that can transmit many basic signals on the LED display as well as custom messages for others who are driving or walking around you. Simply using the detachable wireless controller enables various signals such as directions and emergency indicators.

You can add custom signals through our mobile app. It’s now working only with Android-based phones but as soon as they get permission from Apple, they will provide an app for iPhone users too.

The lights are also both flexible and waterproof.

If you like this concept go support the kickstarter here!